May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.

Romans 15:13

Grace means unmerited favour. It is a free gift of God to us. And if there’s one amazing thing we receive from Jesus, it is grace. It is because of God’s grace that we have been saved (Eph. 2:8). It is because of this same grace that we have access to God. The deposition of the Holy Spirit in our hearts is a result of grace. Since all that we have received from God has been freely given to us, it is safe to infer that all that we have is because of God’s grace. 

The concept of grace goes beyond word use. Some people erringly call it luck, but it is not.  Grace is actually very spiritual and God wants us to have an understanding of this. Contrary to what some people think, God wants us to live consciously of His grace. Grace is not a leeway to sin or a safe spot for those who choose to rebel. The scripture makes this very clear to us (Rom. 6:1-2). As a matter of fact, we are made to understand that grace and truth came by Jesus Christ (John 1:17). The Holy Spirit is the Spirit of grace. The Scripture also tells us that He is full of grace and truth. Therefore, wherever grace is, you can be sure of God’s presence. 

Apostle Paul wrote of how he had been faced with a ‘thorn in the flesh’ and he cried out to God three times to take it away from him. God’s response to that plea was that His grace is sufficient (2 Cor. 12:7-9). This goes on to reveal to us that grace makes burdens lighter. Whatever Paul may have been facing was definitely serious and necessary. God could have taken it away but He chose to tell him about His grace. For some challenges, there might be no way to bypass them. Like a student who has exams to write, except he chooses to forfeit that degree, he must take those exams. God’s grace is available in those times. His strength is perfected in our weakness. For those unavoidable hurdles, His grace is made sufficient for us. 

In the book of Zechariah 4:7 KJV, God was admonishing the people of Israel and He told them to make a bold step. He told them to speak the ‘great’ mountains challenging them saying;  “Who art thou, O great mountain? Before Zerubbabel thou shalt become a plain; and he shall bring forth the headstone thereof with shoutings, crying, ‘Grace, grace unto it!’” (Zechariah 4:7) . Their shouts were cries of grace. One shout of grace and great mountains became leveled plains. 

Grace brings ease. The law made it very difficult and even almost impossible to please God since it operates on a “break one, break all” principle. But grace teaches us to live godly lives (Titus 2:11-12). The scripture prophesied about times when no one would need to be taught the laws of God because everyone would have them inscribed on their heart (Jer. 31:34). This era –the post-Jesus’ death era –is the fulfilment of this prophecy. Pleasing God doesn’t come from a place of compulsion any longer. It has become so easy to do what is right in God’s sight. Grace levels those great mountains that would have required so much strength and time to go over, it makes them plains that are easy to walk across.  

That is why a student overburdened by workload could say a simple prayer asking for God’s grace and end up reading the one part all exam questions were set from. That is why a person could receive in days, what people have toiled for years. Grace is the very reason why we have direct access to God. It is this same grace that the patriarchs looked forward to but never came to fruition in their time (Heb. 11:13)

The concept of grace, as said earlier is not just a synonym with luck. It is not used to describe one lucky moment. Grace, especially when it’s from God, is continuous. Some other bible versions translated “Grace, grace” as “God bless it!” (Zech. 4:7 NIV, NLT). Essentially, the grace of God is a blessing. You can speak ease to that challenging mountain today by speaking ‘grace, grace’ unto it. God’s grace is made sufficient for us and with this grace, comes ease. 


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